10 Questions To Ask The Condo Board

Dated: 03/05/2019

Views: 310

10 QUESTIONS TO ASK THE CONDO BOARD

Before you buy, contact the condo board with the following questions. In the process, you’ll learn how responsive — and organized — its members are. You’ll also be alerted to potential problems with the property.

1. What percentage of units is owner-occupied? What percentage is tenant-occupied? Generally, the higher the percentage of owner-occupied units, the more marketable the units will be at resale.

2. What covenants, bylaws, and restrictions govern the property? What grandfather clauses are in place? You may find, for instance, that those who buy a property after a certain date can’t rent out their units, but buyers who bought earlier can. Ask for a copy of the bylaws to determine if you can live within them. And have an attorney review property docs, including the master deed, for you.

3. How much does the association keep in reserve? Plus, find out how that money is being invested.

4. Are association assessments keeping pace with the annual rate of inflation? Smart boards raise assessments a certain percentage each year to build reserves to fund future repairs. To determine if the assessment is reasonable, compare the rate to others in the area.

5. What does and doesn't the assessment cover? Does the assessment include commonarea maintenance, recreational facilities, trash collection, and snow removal?

6. What special assessments have been mandated in the past five years? How much was each owner responsible for? Some special assessments are unavoidable. But repeated, expensive assessments could be a red flag about the condition of the building or the board’s fiscal policy.

7. How much turnover occurs in the building? This will tell you if residents are generally happy with the building. According to research by the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®, owners of condos in two-to-four unit buildings stay for a median of five years, and owners of condos in a building with five or more units stay for a median of four years.

8. Is the condo building in litigation? This is never a good sign. If the builders or home owners are involved in a lawsuit, reserves can be depleted quickly.

9. Is the developer reputable? Find out what other projects the developer has built and visit one if you can. Ask residents about their perceptions. Request an engineer’s report for developments that have been reconverted from other uses to determine what shape the building is in. If the roof, windows, and bricks aren't in good repair, they become your problem once you buy.

10. Are multiple associations involved in the property? In very large developments, umbrella associations, as well as the smaller association into which you’re buying, may require separate assessments.

The data relating to real estate for sale on this site comes in part from the Broker Reciprocity Program of Georgia MLS. Real estate listings held by brokerage firms other than Results Realty Services are marked with the Broker Reciprocity logo and detailed information about them includes the name of the listing brokers. 


Listing broker has attempted to offer accurate data, but buyers are advised to confirm all items. 

Copyright 2019 Georgia MLS. All rights reserved. 

Latest Blog Posts

17 Tips For Packing Like A Pro

17 TIPS FOR PACKING LIKE A PROMoving to a new home can be stressful, to say the least. Make it easy on yourself by planning far in advance and making sure you’ve covered all the bases.1. Plan

Read More

Closing Documents You Should Keep

CLOSING DOCUMENTS YOU SHOULD KEEPOn closing day, expect to sign a lot of documents and walk away with a big stack of papers. Here’s a list of the most important documents you should file away

Read More

Moving With Pets

MOVING WITH PETSMoving to a new home can be stressful on your pets, but there are many things you can do to make the process as painless as possible. Experts at The Pet Realty Network in Naples,.,

Read More

Common Closing Costs For Buyers

COMMON CLOSING COSTS FOR BUYERSYou’ll likely be responsible for a variety of fees and expenses that you and the seller will have to pay at the time of closing. Your lender must provide a good

Read More